FANDOM


Land use in the United States

The total area of United States is 985,730,600 hectares (nearly 2.3 billion acres), including water.

The farms of the US cover an area of 373,000,000 hectares or 922 million acres (cropland and grazing).[1] The total land in farms decreased from 486,450,424 hectares (1,202,019,000 acres) in 1950 to 370,137,561 hectares (914,240,000 acres) in 2013 - check Farmworkers in the United States article for a full history.

The forest area is 302,000,000 hectares (747 million acres).[2][3]

The United States has a total land area of nearly 2.3 billion acres. In 2007, the major land uses were: [4]

  • forestland at 671 million acres (30%); - 271,549,979 hectares
  • grassland pasture and rangeland at 614 million acres (27%); - 248,482,395 hectares
  • cropland at 408 million acres (18%); - 165,115,337 hectares
  • special uses (primarily parks and wildlife areas) at 313 million acres (14%); - 126,669,364 hectares
  • miscellaneous uses (like tundra or swamps) at 197 million acres (9%); - 79,724,807 hectares
  • urban land at 61 million acres (3%) - 24,686,361 hectares

Alternative data Edit

  • Grazing: about 788 million acres, 41.4 percent, is grazed by livestock.[5] From that, 155 million acres belong to Bureau of Land Management (BLM).[5][6]
  • Grazing: The 2007 National Resources Inventory (NRI) reports 409 million acres of rangeland and 119 million acres of improved pastureland for the contiguous 48 states, which is 21% and 6%, respectively, of the 1.9 billion acres of land and water. In comparison, cropland accounts for 18% of the total with 2% in the Conservation Reserve Program.[7]

Farms by typeEdit

The number of farms in the United States in 2013 was estimated at 2.10 million, totaling 914 million acres, with an average farm size of 435 acres.[8]

Farm numbers and land in farms are differentiated by five economic sales classes. Farms and ranches are classified into these five sales classes by summing the sales of agricultural products and government program payments. Sales class breaks occur at $10,000, $100,000, $250,000 and $500,000.[8]

Farm type Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Total
Revenue / year $1,000 - $9,999 $10,000 - $99,999 $100,000 - $249,999 $250,000 - $499,999 $500,000+ -
No. of farms 1,080,000 620,600 144,300 96,600 161,200 2,102,700
(percent) 51.4% 29.5% 6.9% 4.6% 7.7% 100%
Land in farms (acres) 94,600,000 194,400,000 131,600,000 125,500,000 368,200,000 914,300,000
(percent) 10.3% 21.3% 14.4% 13.7% 40.3% 100%
Average size (acres) 88 313 912 1,298 2,284 -

Price of land Edit

  • 2014: Pasture land: $1,300/acre. Cropland: $4,100/acre [9]
  • 2013: The average value of U.S. pastureland rose 4.3% through the start of this year to $1,200/acre, according to USDA. That’s another new nominal high, but one-third the pace of the booming cropland market, where values inflated another 13% to an average of $4,000/acre.[10] Nationally, in 2013, producers paid an average of $136 per acre to rent cropland.[11] Pasture land: $1,170/acre. Cropland: $3,810/acre [9]
  • 2012: The average value of U.S. pastureland rose 4.5% through the start of this year to $1,150/acre. Cropland: $3,350/acre [12][9]
  • 2003: Cropland: 1,500/acre to buy and $73/acre to rent[11]
  • 1998: Pasture land: $500/acre. Cropland: $1,400/acre [7]

Value of Land in dollars per acre, by year:

Year Cropland Pasture Farm REV Notes
2014 4,100 1,300 2,950 [9]
2013 3,810 1,170 2,730 [9]
2012 3,350 1,110 2,520 [9]
2011 2,980 1,070 2,300 [9]
2010 2,700 1,060 2,150 [9]
2009 2,670 1,070 2,110 [13]
2008 2,760 1,090 2,170 [13]
2007 2,530 1,030 2,010 [13]
2006 2,390 1,000 1,900 [14]
2005 2,110 820 1,650 [14]
2004 1,770 634 1,360 [14]
2003 1,660 605 1,270 [14]
2002 1,590 577 1,210 [14]
2001 1,510 557 1,150 [14]
2000 1,460 531 1,090 [14]
1999 1,400 509 1,030 [14]
1998 1,340 489 974 [14]
1997 1,270 466 926 [15]
1996 - - 887 [15]
1995 - - 844 [15]
1994 - - 782 [16]
1990 - - 683 [17]
1985 - - 713 [17]
1980 - - 737 [17]
  • Farm REV = Farm Real Estate Value - the United States farm real estate value is a measurement of the value of all land and buildings on farms

Variation by location Edit

At the state level, the value of cropland in 2013 ranged from $888 per acre in Montana to $10,190 per acre in California and $12,800 per acre in New Jersey.[11]

Irrigation Edit

U.S. agriculture consumes over 80 percent of the water used in the United. States (Schaible, 2004). Irrigation technology is an important contributor to U.S. agriculture, yet competing demands for water due to population growth, energy sector growth, and environmental needs have intensified. In 2007, nearly 57 million acres (17 percent of all cropland used for crops) was irrigated, yet this acreage generated nearly half the value of all crops sold.[4]

The proportion of irrigated cropland used for crops has been increasing since 1949, when nearly 26 million acres were irrigated.[4]

Conversion of land Edit

Urban land: A 2007 NRI study reported that 40 million acres of land were newly developed between 1982 and 2007, representing a 56% increase, and accounting for more than one-third of all developed land in the lower 48 states. Rangeland with mature trees is often preferred for housing development. Bottomland cropland often is in a flood zone and thus is less desirable for development.[7]

Cropland: A new study published in March by SDSU estimates that 1.3 million acres of grassland were converted to crops in the Dakotas, Minnesota and Nebraska between 2006 and 2011. Such sod-busting for corn and soybean cropping has been concentrated in the Dakotas, east of the Missouri River. The magnitude of this conversion is similar to the peak rates documented during the 1920s and ’30s, when tractors and other mechanized equipment came into widespread use, say study authors Christopher Wright and Michael Wimberly.[10]

Ownership Edit

Nearly 60 percent (1.35 billion acres) of the land in the United States is privately owned. The Federal Government owns 29 percent (653 million acres), over a third of which is in Alaska. State and local governments own about 9 percent (198 million acres). About 3 percent (66 million acres) is in trust by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. There were no major changes in these aggregate ownership statistics from 2002 to 2007. Foreign ownership accounted for about 1 percent (22 million acres) of U.S. land in 2007.[4]

References Edit

  1. wikipedia:Agriculture in the United States
  2. wikipedia:Forests of the United States
  3. wikipedia:List of countries by forest area
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Major Uses of Land in the United States, 2007, by Cynthia Nickerson, Robert Ebel, Allison Borchers, and Fernando Carriazo, USDA - ERS
  5. 5.0 5.1 Is Grass-Fed Beef Better? A Look Into How Much of America's Land is Used for Cattle-Grazing | One Green Planet, July 22, 2014, Rachel Curit, OneGreenPlanet.org
  6. DOI: BLM: Livestock Grazing, March 28, 2014, Bureau of Land Management
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Welcome to Choices Magazine Online!, 2nd Quarter 2011, Damona Doye and B. Wade Brorsen, ChoicesMagazine.org
  8. 8.0 8.1 Farm Labor - 2013, NASS
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 Land Values - 2014, USDA - Agricultural Land Values, usda.mannlib.cornell.edu
  10. 10.0 10.1 Average Value Of U.S. Pastureland Is $1,200 Per Acre | Pasture/Land Values content from BEEF Magazine, Oct 25, 2013, Michael Fritz, BeefMagazine.com
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 2013 Land Values and Cash Rents - Cropland and Pasture, nass.usda.gov
  12. Pasture Values Continue To Rise, But Lag Cropland | Pasture/Land Values content from BEEF Magazine, Sep 25, 2012, Mike Fritz, BeefMagazine.com
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Land Values - 2010, USDA
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 Land Values - 2007, USDA
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 Land Values - 1999, USDA
  16. Land Values - 1997, USDA
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 Land Values - 1998, USDA

External links Edit

Forests
Price of land

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.